Publishing Industry Jobs

As recently as five to seven years ago, careers in the publishing industry were actually limited because of the small number of existing publishing houses, and the majority of those have been privately owned for generations and remain so today. However, many opportunities exist in the publishing industry because of the new innovative technology that has arisen out of the Internet.

Probably the most obvious job within the publishing industry is that of an author. The second most well known or recognized job outside of the publishing industry is that of a literary agent, and the third is editor.

Authors write the material or texts that are to be published. They submit their work to literary agents who forward the work onto the editors of publishing companies. Sometimes authors will forward their work directly onto the editor, foregoing the agent who will take a percentage cut of the author’s paycheck.

If the author is really lucky, the editor will call him directly with a job.

One of the problems is letting go of out-dated thinking and processes. While some places may have a ‘top-down’ problem, others have leadership that actually do think in terms of the 21st century and new media opportunities. But they are most likely the exception. Part of the problem is one of a slow-to-change work culture.

There are many (great) veteran editors and sales people in publishing companies near and far that have held on tightly to the same way of doing things; editors used to only have to work on a print version of a magazine and sales made fairly easy commissions on recurring print advertising. Now editors frequently have several outlets to satisfy (print, web, podcast interviews, webcasts and, yes, videos) while sales people have to sell sponsorships for these new content vehicles. Sales people also need to understand these new technologies to convincingly sell them.

Thepeople working in desktop publishing use a computer software in order to produce and format publication material. They basically use numbers, text and data to prepare the publication material. The publication material can range from newsletters, newspapers to magazines and books.

There is a huge demand for people in the desktop publishing industry. In fact the statistics show that about 4 out of 10 desktop publishing professionals work in various newspapers, books, periodicals and directories. Every 1 professional out of 4 work in the printing industry and other related activities.

The statistics also show that employment figures are also expected to grow faster in the near future.The jobs are easily accessible for people with a certificate or degree. To receive a degree you can get a training from an accredited vocational school or college. The time that you’ll have to invest in order to get a certificate in desktop publishing is not much, in fact it in about a year, what it takes to get yourself a desktop publishing certificate.

There are other lesser known jobs in the publishing industry other than author, agent, editor, and publisher. One of these lesser known jobs is that of author publicist. The publicist takes the published book, the author, and puts together a public relations campaign that goes beyond simply marketing. If the author is a growing phenomenon, chances are that the publicist can be seen right beside the author during book tours.

Jobs & Career Employment After You Have Graduated From University

University graduates are still sought after, which makes a degree in this difficult financial climate worth its weight in gold. Graduate positions have actually increased over the last year, during the recession, and this is leading companies promoting their HR policies of capturing the best minds straight from university.

Jobs in IT, accounting, mechanical engineering, bio sciences are particularly impressive for the graduate as firms in these sectors offer high salaries and many graduate services that announce jobs, like MilkRound will advertise all of these particular jobs. Some jobs are obviously with companies that could feel the pain of the credit crunch but with any gain of experience, you will become immediately more employable even if the worst does happen to you.

Obviously qualifications and skills will get you so far, but with many graduates applying for the same jobs, how can you set yourself apart and differently then the rest? Well the answer is in your character traits, and making them visible to the recruiter. An attitude of enthusiasm, self- motivation and determination will go a long way in any job interview, some companies who offer jobs at entry level, will make a decision based on this alone!

Obviously verbal and writing skills are a necessity and having problem solving skills and being a team player will also endear you to the employer. It is also important to apply for jobs that you are skilled to do. Obviously jobs with 40k salaries look great and you’d love to be on that one, but you need to stay realistic and gain experience in your first few years after university, so apply for jobs you are happy to do.

If you have a Masters degree of an even higher education award then larger businesses in certain sectors may head hunt you, this is certainly true in the past in the banking, insurance and retail management positions. If you have just a bachelors degree then there are many opportunities out there but it will take you longer to get there!

Computer Glasses Ease Eye Strain

How to avoid getting headaches, blurry vision and tired eyes after a day of working on a computer? There’s an easy answer: Computer glasses! The strain on your eyes from working on a computer is a real condition, and it even has a name: computer vision syndrome (CVS). Experts say that looking at computers simply requires your eyes to work in ways that other activities don’t.

Wait a minute, you say. I already wear glasses. And I still get blurry, tired eyes. There are reasons for that. Ergonomics experts – the folks who measure how your body performs tasks – note that most computer screens sit 20 to 26 inches from your eyes. Your eye doctor calls this range the intermediate zone of vision – closer than distance vision, but farther away than reading.

Most people under age 40 who wear glasses get them to correct their distance vision. Those of us over age 40 often get eyeglasses to correct the onset of a condition known as presbyopia – the loss of focusing ability that’s normal as we age. The problem is, eyeglasses made to correct either of these conditions don’t address what’s happening in the intermediate zone of vision – that space between you and your computer screen! Even bifocals, trifocals and progressive lenses aren’t made for computer-range vision.

Recent research has supported the use of computer glasses. The researchers found that even when CVS symptoms weren’t reported, workers clearly showed differences in their productivity and accuracy. So you can just pick up a pair of computer glasses at the local office supply store, right? Well, maybe. The advantage to buying off the rack is clearly price, but if you have other vision problems, those single-lens glasses might not be the best for you. Experts say the trick to getting that off-the-rack pair is to test them by reading something that’s the same distance from your eyes as the computer screen — 20 to 26 inches.

There can be bifocals, trifocals or occupational progressive lenses. The advantage to these more expensive styles is that you’ll be able to see clearly whether you’re looking at your computer, reading notes on your desk or winking at that cute co-worker across the cubicle from you. The drawbacks, of course, are that these styles require a visit to your eye doctor and usually cost around 0 or more.